Arrow Films

Jean-Luc Godard’s ferocious run of ground breaking 1960s commercial features neared a terminus point as the filmmaker turned his gaze onto the nascent left-wing student organisations coalescing on university campuses across France and environs. The resulting film was his searing masterpiece La Chinoise — a mordant satire, pedagogical treatise, political tract, and pop-artwork-“plus blood” rolled into one.

It’s early ’67 and Radio Peking’s in the air for the Aden Arabie Cell, a Maoist collective holed up in a sprawling flat on Paris’s rue de Miromesnil — the newly purchased actual residence of Godard and then-wife and star Anne Wiazemsky. Véronique (Wiazemsky) and her comrades, including Jean-Pierre Léaud (The 400 Blows, Out 1) and Juliet Berto (Out 1, Céline and Julie Go Boating) lead a series of discussions and performative skits addressing matters of French colonialism, American imperialism, and the broader conflict raging in Vietnam. A meditation on the efficacy of violent protest and militant counteraction played out between Wiazemsky (conducted by Godard via radio-earpiece), and her then-tutor philosopher Francis Jeanson gives way to a plot to assassinate the Soviet minister of culture — a red-handed point of no going-back on the path to complete radicalisation.

A tour-de-force of the primary-palette images — the ‘household images,’ perhaps — of Godard’s early career, La Chinoise serves as both cautionary tale and early sign of fascination with the political currents that would soon lead to the next period of JLG’s life and work. — “The revolution is not a dinner-party.”

Special Features

  • High Definition (1080p) Blu-ray presentation
  • Original LPCM Mono 2.0 audio
  • Optional English subtitles
  • Audio commentary by film historian James Quandt
  • Interviews with actor Michel Semeniako, assistant director Charles L. Bitsch and second assistant director Jean-Claude Sussfeld
  • Denitza Bantcheva on La Chinoise, the author discusses the film and its politics
  • Behind-the-Scenes TV Report featuring footage with Godard and the cast
  • Venice Film Festival press conference featuring Godard and scenes from the production
  • Theatrical trailer
  • Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Matthew Griffin
studio:
Arrow Academy
Run Time:
96 mins approx.
Certificate:
PG
Aspect Ratio:
1.37:1
Main Language:
French
Number of Discs:
1
Brand:
Arrow Academy
Director:
Jean-Luc Godard
Actor:
Anne Wiazemsky
Subtitle Languages:

English / English SDH

Theatrical Release Year:
1967
Region:
2

B

La Chinoise

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Arrow Films

Jean-Luc Godard’s ferocious run of ground breaking 1960s commercial features neared a terminus point as the filmmaker turned his gaze onto the nascent left-wing student organisations coalescing on university campuses across France and environs. The resulting film was his searing masterpiece La Chinoise — a mordant satire, pedagogical treatise, political tract, and pop-artwork-“plus blood” rolled into one.

It’s early ’67 and Radio Peking’s in the air for the Aden Arabie Cell, a Maoist collective holed up in a sprawling flat on Paris’s rue de Miromesnil — the newly purchased actual residence of Godard and then-wife and star Anne Wiazemsky. Véronique (Wiazemsky) and her comrades, including Jean-Pierre Léaud (The 400 Blows, Out 1) and Juliet Berto (Out 1, Céline and Julie Go Boating) lead a series of discussions and performative skits addressing matters of French colonialism, American imperialism, and the broader conflict raging in Vietnam. A meditation on the efficacy of violent protest and militant counteraction played out between Wiazemsky (conducted by Godard via radio-earpiece), and her then-tutor philosopher Francis Jeanson gives way to a plot to assassinate the Soviet minister of culture — a red-handed point of no going-back on the path to complete radicalisation.

A tour-de-force of the primary-palette images — the ‘household images,’ perhaps — of Godard’s early career, La Chinoise serves as both cautionary tale and early sign of fascination with the political currents that would soon lead to the next period of JLG’s life and work. — “The revolution is not a dinner-party.”

Special Features

  • High Definition (1080p) Blu-ray presentation
  • Original LPCM Mono 2.0 audio
  • Optional English subtitles
  • Audio commentary by film historian James Quandt
  • Interviews with actor Michel Semeniako, assistant director Charles L. Bitsch and second assistant director Jean-Claude Sussfeld
  • Denitza Bantcheva on La Chinoise, the author discusses the film and its politics
  • Behind-the-Scenes TV Report featuring footage with Godard and the cast
  • Venice Film Festival press conference featuring Godard and scenes from the production
  • Theatrical trailer
  • Reversible sleeve featuring original and newly commissioned artwork by Matthew Griffin
studio:
Arrow Academy
Run Time:
96 mins approx.
Certificate:
PG
Aspect Ratio:
1.37:1
Main Language:
French
Number of Discs:
1
Brand:
Arrow Academy
Director:
Jean-Luc Godard
Actor:
Anne Wiazemsky
Subtitle Languages:

English / English SDH

Theatrical Release Year:
1967
Region:
2

B

Customer Reviews

Overall Rating : 5.0 / 5 (1 Reviews)
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Top Customer Reviews

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Mao Mao

A social investigation conducted by Godard on the youth preceding the events of May. There is much going behind the screen and the great extras of the Arrow release helps to elucidate much of the films contexts, ideas and motifs. Along with the other Godard + Gorin releases, Arrow has realeses Godard's most political and instigating films.

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